MiamiRealEstateKing

5 Buyer tips for Distressed Properties

In bank-owned properties, Buyers, closing, credit, Distressed Sales, Downtown Miami, fannie mae, FHA, First-Time Buyer, Fl, florida, forclosure, foreclosure, Freddie Mac, government, Home Buyer, home sellers, HomePath, HomeSteps, HUD, Investing, Investor, lenders, Loan Program, miami beach, Miami-Dade County, mortgage, real estate, REO, Short Sales, South Beach on January 24, 2011 at 4:56 pm

Miami Beach, Fla. – Jan. 24, 2011 – Wenceslao Fernandez, Jr, a Florida real estate agent with Keller Williams Realty who specializes in Downtown Miami and Miami Beach properties, has come up with five tips to help distressed property buyers. These tips should work in virtually any U.S. market.

Wenceslao says that, “even seasoned investors don’t always follow or understand these practical tips”.

1. Work with a full-time Realtor(c). After the bust, many agents left the business so, not all real estate agents are in the business full time or even Realtors(c) any more. The term Realtor(c) can only be used by members of the National Association of Realtors (NAR), who adhere to their strict Code of Ethics. When it comes to distressed properties, a specialist is your best bet. Look for a Realtor(c) who is also a Certified Distressed Property Expert (www.CDPE.com), and who’s able to guide you with the right strategy for making offers on Short Sales or REOs. Many buyers assume that all agents have the knowledge to help them with these two distinct types of distressed property sellers. Like with hiring any professional (doctor, attorney, plumber, CPA), hiring the right agent to help you through this process, is key.

2. REO properties have the advantage of faster closings. Their disadvantage is that, more than 90% of the time, they only sell for cash and there may be multiple, competing offers on the table. On the other hand, although you can also pick up a Short Sale at a bargain price, there is nothing “short” about the amount of time they take to even be accepted. Some lenders negotiate quickly, others still drag their feet. It is not unusual to wait two or three months or longer, just to hear whether your offer was accepted by the seller’s lender – then the actual sales and closing process begins. Their advantage is that often, they are in better condition, especially if they are still being lived-in by the owner(s), and your offer may be the only offer the lender is considering for approval – minimizing the bidding wars of multiple offers often seen with REO sales.

3. Bargaining for less than the asking price will be a function of many factors. Many REO’s are listed well below market and attract a lot of attention. Making sure you offers wins the “bid”, may require a full-price offer and often, even a slightly more aggressive offer. Short sales may allow you a little more flexibility – as long as the offer is within reason for the property condition and local (building or area), market condition. Sellers of REO don’t typically want to hold these too long and are usually motivated. Lenders who have been going through a long, pre-foreclosure process are also motivated but may only be “servicing” the loan and the bulk of the decision, may be dependent on the investors behind the loan and/or mortgage insurance folk.

4. Avoid complicated offers. REO sellers typically prefer clean offers. The less contingencies you attach to your offer, the cleaner the transaction flow is expected, the better the chances are that they’ll agree with your offer. Lenders looking to approve a short sale may agree to some concessions. The worst that can happen is that they say no. In either case, sometimes lenders are quite accommodating – even REO lenders who already have possession of the property are known to give concessions if inspections reveal certain problems not previously known or problems which were not readily visible. Otherwise, most of these purchases are “as-is, where-is” and you should know what you are getting into. Being “handy” may not qualify you to throughly inspect and understand what you are about to buy.

5. Get the right pre-approval from the right lender. Regardless of which type of property you intend to buy (whether distressed or not), having this approval letter ahead of time will ensure you move forward. Most offers to be considered, must be accompanied by this letter. REO properties are typically sold for cash. However, properties now held by Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac or HUD, will often consider financing offers during the first 15 days a property is listed, as long as the buyer is an owner-occupant. Even if the REO or Short Sale property needs repairs, there are loans that allow the buyer to borrow additional funds for repairs. Make sure you lender understands FHA-203k, Home Steps and Home Path loans and that they have a thorough understanding of any other government program you may qualify for.

Want to know more? Contact Wenceslao Fernandez Jr HERE.

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