MiamiRealEstateKing

Archive for the ‘Buyers’ Category

Six Ways Investing in Real Estate Can Save You Money

In Buyers, Commercial Real Estate, florida, Investing, Investor, IRS, miami, miami beach, Miami-Dade County, Multi-Family Real Estate, real estate, Roth-IRA, Self-Directed IRA, Sellers, tax deductions, Tax Matters on May 10, 2013 at 1:28 pm

There are many investment vehicles. Stocks, bonds, art, coins, postage stamps, toys, commodities and real estate, among others.

Some economists even suggest that as long as you are disciplined and can comfortably pay for it, you should buy any investment you can. If you can finance the purchase, even better.

However, real estate is probably the only one against which you can borrow and have the asset pay itself off through rental income, EVEN as it pays YOU.

In fact, I have spoken to property owners who have managed to leverage a property two, even three times in their lifetime, by borrowing against the property they now own free and clear, to buy another.

What’s more, the income from the new property (let’s call it property B), paid with borrowed funds from say, property A, plus the income they still generate from that newly leveraged property A, can over time, pay back the loan on A from rent collections on A and B, while proving the owner with a boost in passive income. In other words, party money.

Even if you can purchase property in cash, many recommend you consider financing after the fact. Leveraging allows you to possibly, acquire two or more properties, update or fix them up and let themselves carry the burden of paying down the loans with rental income.

Over time, you would have the ability to acquire even more properties and eventually, when you are at the right stage in your life, own them all free and clear while enjoying all that income in retirement. The ultimate 401K or IRA.

Of course, you must buy right and be disciplined throughout. With every payment received in rents, you must set aside a portion every month to pay for licenses, taxes, insurance maintenance and miscellaneous repairs, improvements, etc. In short, you must budget as you would with any business.

Below, we examine some of the advantages for owning investment property and in particular, multi-family property.

1. Economies of Scale

When you buy a single family house or condo unit, small investors often feel they’re easy to manage. That may be true to some extend. On the other hand, consider that with a multi-family building, you only deal with one roof and/or one yard to mow, you are the board that approves tenants or how many times a year you rent your property and in one single trip, you can fumigate, inspect and have a punch list ready for your handyman, plumber and/or electrician to take care of, minimizing headaches.

2. Lower Taxes

There are several tax incentives for real estate investors. If you are employed, deductions from real estate investments may be used to offset wage income. In addition, there are a number of tax breaks for real estate investment which often allow property owners to turn a loss into a profit. Deductions can include any actual costs involved in financing, managing and operating the property, to include maintenance, repairs, property management fees, travel, advertising, and utilities. In addition, the IRS allows a depreciation deduction that accounts for a portion of the building (not the land portion of the property) over time, usually some 27 years.

3. Cash Flow

A property can generate negative or positive cash flow. Cash flow simply refers to the amount of money that flows in and out in pursuit of maintaining a property. Rents are an example of cash flowing in while taxes and insurance must be paid out, typically from a portion of the rents received. When the amount of income received exceeds the payments, it is said you have a positive cash flow. There are times when the amount of payments exceed your income and in these cases, you are said to have a negative cash flow. Regardless, when it comes to real estate investment, there are two more important concepts involved: pre-tax and after-tax. A pre-tax positive cash flow for instance, may also be said to occur when income received is greater than expenses before taxes are paid. However, even if your are experiencing a negative cash flow, you may end up with an after-tax positive income when your expenses are more than your collected income, but the tax breaks bring you back in the black. Depreciation can often help turn a negative into a positive.

4. Use Leverage

An old rule of thumb in real estate is to never spend a dime on your real estate investment unless you have to and/or unless it will save you money. Leverage is an important aspect of saving money through real estate investment because a real estate investor uses leverage to increase their assets without spending their own money. By taking advantage of your equity, you also improve your return on equity and it provides you with tax-free funds to help fund your next deal or improve the value of your existing property by making updates, upgrades or repairs that entice tenants (to come in or stay) and should allow you to raise rents and improve your bottom line.

5. Equity Growth

The best way to save money and earn money, is to build up equity from real estate investments. That way, with high equity you are able to save on your mortgage while earning a nice chunk of profit. However, idle equity is like idle funds in the bank. Ideally, you are always utilizing your equity to improve the value of the property and/or pursuing and acquiring new opportunities. Often, selling is a great way to take advantage of existing equity, which would allow you to reposition yourself in a potentially better property with better opportunities. For instance, you may own a building sitting on prime land which may allow you to build a much larger structure for more potential. However, you are not a builder and you’re not in the mood to start. Even if that property is making money, selling it may bring enough to allow you to purchase a more suitable property or properties.

6. The Benefits of Inflation

Generally speaking, inflation can help you save money on your real estate investment because as rent increases, your mortgage costs will remain static (assuming it is a fix-rate loan), which means you will improve your position with the increased cash flow from the rent and equity growth. Although inflation is quite low these days, there is a typical amount of appreciation properties experience as a result of even low inflation, which adds to your equity without a single penny out of pocket.

Of course, it is not all rosey with real estate investing. There are a LOT of factors that deter people from getting involved. It is scary, you could lose a lot if you engage from an emotional standpoint and there are headaches and horror stories borne from bad tenant situations to fill a few books.

Regardless, I reiterate that if you buy properly, budget properly and stay involved, you may never have to worry about money when it counts – throughout the live of the property and during your retirement. What could be more beautiful than that?

Most real estate professionals can help a buyer or seller make the right buy or sell decisions. Obviously, as you would listen to a quality attorney, doctor or accountant, listening to a quality real estate professional’s valuable information will go a long way in helping you achieve your buying or selling goal. Budgeting however, is a function of habit and here again, you must proactively seek qualified, quality, professional advise.

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July home sales in Miami – a reflection of the economy at large

In Buyers, Condo rules, FIU, Fl, Florida Legislature, government, HAMP, Home Warranty, HomePath, Investing, Lease Agreements, Leasing, lenders, Loan Originator, scams, SIOR, Treasury on September 3, 2011 at 9:52 am

Some say our economy will not recover until this or that is changed. Some feel housing must recover in order for everything else to recover. Others blame the low dollar, the amount of money that is printed, Europe, earthquakes and climate change.

I still feel that the key to a recovery is JOBS. Without jobs, folks’ confidence and ability to spend and qualify to buy homes, will remain low – hec…non-existent.

With unemployment stubbornly high above 9% (well over 18% according to experts if one includes the under-employed and all those who just…quit looking), it is no wonder housing can’t seem to recover.

In spite of Miami’s ability to appeal to the affluence of non-residents and investors (and THANK GOD for that), Miami’s home resale market looms.

One great aspect is that Miami’s available real estate inventory for sale has been rapidly dropping from a high of 24,368 units in Sept., 2010 to our July, 2011 low of 15,578 units available for sale. A 63.9% drop in inventory, 4.3% lower than June, 2011’s inventory of 16,272 units, 35% lower than the 23,976 units in July, 2010 and almost 32% lower than at the end of the same quarter in 2010. The drop of New listings has also helped inventory levels continue to drop.

By all accounts, less inventory is great. This generally means that buyers have less inventory to choose from and that prices should begin to pick up. Supply and demand. Yet, low supply continues to be coupled to low demand as reflected by the meek Pending sales number between June and July, 2011 (2.2% lower) and the much weaker Sold (Closed) units which dropped 21% between June and July, 2011.

Thankfully, Pending Sales (an indicator of future closed sales), had been quite strong in July, 2011 as compared to July, 2010 (up 19.4%) and as reflected by the Pending Sales number between the end of Q1-2011 as compared to Q1-2010 (up 21.1%).

Will these numbers improve? Again – I say, not until JOBS recover.

Comparing sectors of our market, sales in properties valued at different price ranges appear to be mimicking the market at large, including market segments under $500,000 and between $500,000 and just under $2M as shown in the two charts below

Under $500,000

Between $500,000 to just under $2M

Between $2M and just under $5M, we begin to see some changes, though Pending Sales – the so important forward looking indicator of future closed sales has completely stalled.

Above, are the numbers for properties valued at between $2M and $5M

However, by the time we get to homes valued at $5M and above, the difference is stark.

Above, properties in our highest market segment – above $5M

As you can see, properties valued at $5M and above are among the only market segment displaying improvement on all accounts. Between June and July, 2011, between July, 2011 and July, 2010 and between Q1-2011 and Q1-2010. Most impressive are the improvements between July, 2010 and July, 2011. I mean, 10 properties Sold and 12 under contract may not seem like much until you are reminded that these are at least $5,000,000 a pop and financing…well…this is not their bag.

So, the $5M and above market segment is where most affluent buyers are doing their bidding. After all this is Miami!

5 Buyer tips for Distressed Properties

In bank-owned properties, Buyers, closing, credit, Distressed Sales, Downtown Miami, fannie mae, FHA, First-Time Buyer, Fl, florida, forclosure, foreclosure, Freddie Mac, government, Home Buyer, home sellers, HomePath, HomeSteps, HUD, Investing, Investor, lenders, Loan Program, miami beach, Miami-Dade County, mortgage, real estate, REO, Short Sales, South Beach on January 24, 2011 at 4:56 pm

Miami Beach, Fla. – Jan. 24, 2011 – Wenceslao Fernandez, Jr, a Florida real estate agent with Keller Williams Realty who specializes in Downtown Miami and Miami Beach properties, has come up with five tips to help distressed property buyers. These tips should work in virtually any U.S. market.

Wenceslao says that, “even seasoned investors don’t always follow or understand these practical tips”.

1. Work with a full-time Realtor(c). After the bust, many agents left the business so, not all real estate agents are in the business full time or even Realtors(c) any more. The term Realtor(c) can only be used by members of the National Association of Realtors (NAR), who adhere to their strict Code of Ethics. When it comes to distressed properties, a specialist is your best bet. Look for a Realtor(c) who is also a Certified Distressed Property Expert (www.CDPE.com), and who’s able to guide you with the right strategy for making offers on Short Sales or REOs. Many buyers assume that all agents have the knowledge to help them with these two distinct types of distressed property sellers. Like with hiring any professional (doctor, attorney, plumber, CPA), hiring the right agent to help you through this process, is key.

2. REO properties have the advantage of faster closings. Their disadvantage is that, more than 90% of the time, they only sell for cash and there may be multiple, competing offers on the table. On the other hand, although you can also pick up a Short Sale at a bargain price, there is nothing “short” about the amount of time they take to even be accepted. Some lenders negotiate quickly, others still drag their feet. It is not unusual to wait two or three months or longer, just to hear whether your offer was accepted by the seller’s lender – then the actual sales and closing process begins. Their advantage is that often, they are in better condition, especially if they are still being lived-in by the owner(s), and your offer may be the only offer the lender is considering for approval – minimizing the bidding wars of multiple offers often seen with REO sales.

3. Bargaining for less than the asking price will be a function of many factors. Many REO’s are listed well below market and attract a lot of attention. Making sure you offers wins the “bid”, may require a full-price offer and often, even a slightly more aggressive offer. Short sales may allow you a little more flexibility – as long as the offer is within reason for the property condition and local (building or area), market condition. Sellers of REO don’t typically want to hold these too long and are usually motivated. Lenders who have been going through a long, pre-foreclosure process are also motivated but may only be “servicing” the loan and the bulk of the decision, may be dependent on the investors behind the loan and/or mortgage insurance folk.

4. Avoid complicated offers. REO sellers typically prefer clean offers. The less contingencies you attach to your offer, the cleaner the transaction flow is expected, the better the chances are that they’ll agree with your offer. Lenders looking to approve a short sale may agree to some concessions. The worst that can happen is that they say no. In either case, sometimes lenders are quite accommodating – even REO lenders who already have possession of the property are known to give concessions if inspections reveal certain problems not previously known or problems which were not readily visible. Otherwise, most of these purchases are “as-is, where-is” and you should know what you are getting into. Being “handy” may not qualify you to throughly inspect and understand what you are about to buy.

5. Get the right pre-approval from the right lender. Regardless of which type of property you intend to buy (whether distressed or not), having this approval letter ahead of time will ensure you move forward. Most offers to be considered, must be accompanied by this letter. REO properties are typically sold for cash. However, properties now held by Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac or HUD, will often consider financing offers during the first 15 days a property is listed, as long as the buyer is an owner-occupant. Even if the REO or Short Sale property needs repairs, there are loans that allow the buyer to borrow additional funds for repairs. Make sure you lender understands FHA-203k, Home Steps and Home Path loans and that they have a thorough understanding of any other government program you may qualify for.

Want to know more? Contact Wenceslao Fernandez Jr HERE.

Miami sales up – and it’s no longer just me saying it…!

In Buyers, closing, Downtown Miami, First Time Sellers, First-Time Buyer, florida, Home Buyer, home sellers, Industry trends, miami, miami beach, Miami-Dade County, real estate, second home, Sellers, South Beach, vacation home on December 23, 2010 at 12:49 pm

It is no longer me saying it. The Miami Herald just published the article in the link below.

http://www.miamiherald.com/2010/12/22/1985942/condo-sales-heat-up-as-deals-resume.html

If you are THINKING about buying…well….I’m not really sure what there is to think about.

Think about it too long and with Average AND Median “closed” prices up in October AND November, PLUS interest rates up for 5 weeks straight, “thinking” may start to get expensive – even price you right out of the market.  THE WINDOW MAY BE STARTING TO CLOSE. Snooze and well…lose?

Sellers can’t get too excited still though. Properties sold are still the properties “on sale”. Who in their right mind would buy milk  for $9 a gallon if they can pick it up down the street for $3.49/gal.?  Not many, I’d guess.

This is no time to let greed creep up your spine if you are looking to get your place ‘sold’. This is the time to sit with your agent and find out what exactly needs to happen to move your property from the “for sale” (hope and wish list) or “expired” (rejected), side of the ledger to the “sold” side of the ledger.  What a weight off your shoulders if this needs to happen for you soon.

If you don’t need to sell right now and you intend to wait for the right buyer to come along, you may be much better served taking the property off the market and reposition it to SELL in a few months when you see yet more confirmation that you can finally get that magic number you need or want.

Keep in mind though, if you are waiting to sell in order to buy your next home, that other property may also cost you more when you finally get yours sold. If you are looking to find a bargain you can buy…getting that property sold today will help ensure you don’t miss this great opportunity to also buy at bargain prices.

As the old saying goes…pay the piper now…or pay the piper later. Perhaps you Sell low and then Buy low. Otherwise, may be you get to Sell high to Buy high. You choose.

Average 30-year fixed mortgage rises to 4.83%

In Buyers, credit, Home Buyer, Industry trends, Interest Rates, Loan Program, miami beach, Miami-Dade County, mortgage, real estate, Trends on December 17, 2010 at 6:01 pm

NEW YORK (AP) – Dec. 17, 2010 – Rates on fixed mortgages surged for the fifth straight week, reflecting higher yields on long-term Treasurys.

Freddie Mac said Thursday the average rate on a 30-year fixed mortgage rose to 4.83 percent from 4.61 percent in the previous week. Last month, the rate hit a 40-year low of 4.17 percent.

The average rate on the 15-year loan also increased to 4.17 percent from 3.96 percent. It reached 3.57 percent in November, the lowest level on records dating back to 1991.

Rates are on the rise after falling for seven months.

Investors are shifting money out of Treasurys and into stocks. That’s largely on the expectation that the tax-cut plan that Congress is set to approve will spur growth and potentially higher inflation.

Yields tend to rise on fears of higher inflation. Mortgage rates track the yields on the 10-year Treasury note.

The sell-off in the 10-year Treasury note is complicating the Federal Reserve’s efforts to lower interest rates by buying up $600 billion in Treasurys. Some traders had hoped the central bank would boost the scale of its purchases to keep interest rates down.

The increase in rates already is chilling the housing market. Refinance activity fell last week for the fifth straight week, while the number of people applying for a mortgage to purchase a home dropped 5 percent from the previous week, the Mortgage Bankers Association said.

To calculate average mortgage rates, Freddie Mac collects rates from lenders across the country on Monday through Wednesday of each week. Rates often fluctuate significantly, even within a single day.

The average rate on a five-year adjustable-rate mortgage rose to 3.77 percent from 3.60 percent. The five-year hit 3.25 percent last month, the lowest rate on records dating back to January 2005.

The average rate on one-year adjustable-rate home loans edged up to 3.35 percent from 3.27 percent.

The rates do not include add-on fees, known as points. One point is equal to 1 percent of the total loan amount. The average fee for all mortgages in Freddie Mac’s survey was 0.7 point.

Copyright © 2010 The Associated Press, Janna Herron, AP real estate writer.

With Average Closed Prices and Median Closed Prices up two months in a row in Miami-Dade and rates up for 5th straight week you must carefully consider – are you being priced-out of the market….again?!

 

MIAMI’S CLOSED PRICES UP FOR SECOND MONTH IN A ROW

In Buyers, First Time Sellers, First-Time Buyer, florida, Home Buyer, home sellers, homeowner, Industry trends, Interest Rates, Investing, Investor, Kiyosaki, miami, miami beach, Miami-Dade County, real estate, second home, Self-Directed IRA, Sellers, Short Sales, South Beach, Trends, Wenceslao on December 10, 2010 at 3:16 pm

Not surprisingly, Miami-Dade county’s Average and Median Closed prices were up again, for the second month in a row.

Recently, you read my blog post “LISTENING TO NATIONAL REAL ESTATE NEWS MAY BE DANGEROUS TO YOUR FINANCIAL HEALTH” where in response to recent news claiming that national resale prices were down 2% in Q3/2010, I reported that these were already stale reports that were 2-months old and that by contrast, in October, 2010, the Average Closed Price in Miami-Dade had gone up 6.3% while the Median Closed Price went up 5.5% from September, 2010.

As it turns out in November, 2010 and for the second month in a row, the Average Closed Price in Miami-Dade went up another 5.7% and Median Closed Prices also went up another 3.8% from Oct./2010.

Although the number of properties Sold went down 9.4% from October, 2010, and 1.1% from October, 2009, the number of Pending Sales was up again by 4.1% from October 2010 and up 38.3% from October, 2009.

So, is this proof certain that we’ve hit bottom? I don’t know.

What I do know is that, if you are looking to buy in Miami-Dade county, and you are looking to close before the 12/31/2010 deadline so you can get the deductibility and Homestead Exemption, you must hurry.

Although you do not need to have the deed recorded by 12/31/2010, all documents must be executed by then.

Also, waiting may already cost some people about 12% more based on the recent increases in the Average Closed Price since September, 2010 and 9.3% more based on the Median Closed Price since September, 2010, which stood at $125,000 then and stands at $135,000 as of November, 2010.

Sellers must also understand that, this is NO time to play or allow greed to take over. It is time however to get serious about discussing your marketing with your Realtor.

There are several components of marketing and Sellers control one of the most critical: PRICE

Although a buyer’s ability to have easy access to see the property and how the property shows (is it staged or cluttered), are also two-critical components sellers control, price is a function of almost everything else, including property condition, market condition and other factors we cannot control.

Your professional Realtor controls the promotion and marketing of the property. However, when a property does not show very well or making showing appointments becomes inconvenient for buyers, your Realtor’s best efforts to get the property sold at the highest price, within the shortest time and the least hassles, may be (at least to a degree), negated.

Buyers on the other hand are competing for deals with other buyers and investors. This is no time to hesitate, over-analyze or waste time before looking at the potential deals your Realtor is sending you. It is also no time to second-guess prices if you are at risk of suddenly, being priced out of the market.

With prices on the rise and interest rates also on the rise (even if marginal), the combination of higher prices and higher rates could be lethal to a border-line buyer.

If you are looking to make a purchase or selling decision in the next 15-30 days, don’t hesitate to contact a professional Realtor (remember, not all real estate agents are Realtors – members of the National Association of Realtors who adhere to a strict Code of Ethics), and one who is additionally trained in helping you navigate through the idiosyncrasies of distressed properties*.

If you are looking to sell (not list for sale but list to sell), you may request a Free Market Analysis at FreeMiamiHomeValuation. There is no cost or obligation and you will also get two special reports with your Free Valuation report and will also entitle you to a 30-minute, no cost or obligation consultation.

For Miami Beach, the numbers are even more staggering.  Closed sales in November, 2010 were up 5.9% from October, 2010 and up a whopping 38.5% from October, 2009.

At the same time, Pending Sales in November, 2010 were up 42.1% from October, 2010 while up an incredible 80% from October, 2009, clearly demonstrating that the beaches, as a localized location, is quite more attractive and continues to produce strong results.

More on Miami Beach on a separate post.

*Visit www.CDPE.com and find a Certified Distressed Property Agent near you.  With about 29,000 CDPE’s nationwide, this is the largest professional association of its kind in the nation.

YEAR-END OFFER FOR BUYERS

In Biscayne Boulevard, Brickell Avenue, Buyers, Downtown Miami, florida, foreclosure, foreign nationals, Home Buyer, miami beach, real estate, South Beach on November 12, 2010 at 12:05 pm

MY WAY TO STIMULATE THE ECONOMY…AND YOUR BOTTOM LINE

 

I may not be able to solve the national debt issues, but I do have a way to help stimulate your economy

I am offering Qualified Buyers my VIP Buyer Year-End Special Offer.

 

It consists of a credit at closing of 20% of my commission for purchases closed on or before 12/31/2010.

If you are a cash buyer, ready to commit today, you may qualify and receive at closing 20% of my commission.

Use this towards closing costs, repairs, decorations or anything you want

 

This is my way of saying THANK YOU for your loyal business in 2010

 

Just email me at UpscaleMiamiLiving@Gmail.com or

call 786-693-2269 and make sure to slowly and clearly spell all names and numbers.

Beacon Economics: Housing most affordable in more than 40 years

In Buyers, Distressed Sales, fannie mae, First Time Sellers, First-Time Buyer, florida, forclosure, foreclosure, foreclosure moratorium, foreclosure prevention scam, government, Home Buyer, home sellers, homeowner, lenders, miami, miami beach, Miami-Dade County, modification, mortgage, new rules, real estate, REO, scams, Short Sales, Wenceslao on October 15, 2010 at 3:51 pm

Beacon Economics: Housing most affordable in more than 40 years SAN FRANCISCO – Oct. 13, 2010 – Beacon Economics’ new Beacon Economics Home Affordability Index finds that in August homes were at their most affordable level since data became available (1969). Beacon Economics developed the Beacon Economics Home Affordability Index based on the percentage of income an average family would need in order to make mortgage payments on an average priced home.

The August estimate shows the cost of homeownership (mortgage interest plus principal payments after a 20 percent downpayment) falling to 16.9 percent from 17.1 percent in July. Overall, the Beacon Economics Home Affordability Index has remained below 20 percent for the past twenty-one months.

“Home affordability has reached an historic high,” says Beacon Economics Founding Principal Christopher Thornberg. “Nationwide, prices are down approximately 25 percent from their peak, and mortgage financing rates are at all-time lows.” Moreover, the high level of affordability is likely to drive demand and reduce the stock of excess inventory, ultimately resulting in the need for new housing, a rise in prices, and a pickup in new construction, according to Thornberg.

“While prices may fluctuate modestly over the next several months, we believe the worst of the housing crisis is behind us,” adds Beacon Economics Research Manager Jordan G. Levine. “We expect prices to stabilize around current levels and likely be higher in the next twelve months.”

Thornberg agrees. “Although there could be some modest volatility over the next several months, our research indicates the housing market is at or near the bottom,” he says.

The Beacon Economics Home Affordability Index is intended to help homebuyers and policymakers alike understand the current state of the market.

Reprinted by Permission: © 2010 Florida Realtors®

Open Letter to Obama and Congress

In bank-owned properties, Buyers, credit, Distressed Sales, First Time Sellers, First-Time Buyer, florida, forclosure, foreclosure, foreclosure moratorium, government, Home Buyer, home sellers, homeowner, Industry trends, Investing, Investor, IRS, lenders, Loan Program, Market Report, miami, miami beach, Miami-Dade County, mortgage, NAR, National, new rules, Obama, real estate, REO, Sellers, Short Sales, South Beach, Wenceslao on October 15, 2010 at 11:08 am

With our economy draging (in spite of the recession being over according to “experts”), it is more important than ever to find common ground, leave politics aside, get comfortable, get friendly and come together to find answers, compromises and solutions.

The recent foreclosure fiasco is absolutely appalling. The government and oversight entities, failed; banks and investment houses, failed; borrowers failed and everyone in between, failed; while those who were never even interested and stayed in the sidelines,  are all paying for it.

Some title insurers are already issuing statements refusing to insure recently litigated foreclosure properties.

If we want to see this country come out of the ashes and be the beacon of financial opportunity for everyone again, we need to start coming up with ways to incentivise certain bahaviour and dis-incentivise other.

For instance…for prices to begin to stabilize, even increase, real estate needs to improve. For this to happen, we all agree that jobs must improve.

Looking at the stabilization of real estate, there are certain actions that can be taken with government policy/legislation that will motivate lenders to act in a way that will, in my view, improve market conditions.

The now on-going foreclosure fiasco, has investors/first-time buyers in the sidelines or competing for less properties. An unintended consequence of this may be that prices may begin to rise as buyers/investors compete over remaining inventories, raising the bottom to new highs during this period.

Temporarily, this may also drive investors across the proverbial fence if they insist in avoiding Short Sales and feel that they don’t want to compete at higher prices for the REO inventory now in play.

The higher prices go, the more diluted their returns can be if they feel that the increases are still unsustainable until the employment/ tax situation is sorted.

Lenders must be given a choice to either continue to pay more attention to the REO area of their business, rather than to actually begin to pay attention to short sales and to divert attention and resources that lead to the settlement and conclusion of these, less costly deals.

To continue to ignore this cheaper, friendlier and still competitive alternative that helps save money in legal and other REO related expenses and legal responsibilities and liabilities, while helping to stabilize neighborhoods further, would be a shame.

Worst still…for the government to continue to incentivise rather than dis-incentivise lenders to take the REO route with pain – pleasure oriented programs that help lenders “choose” to continue rather than to abandon the REO alternative (unless absolutely necessary), in favor of the short sale route, would be aweful.

Leadership, starts with our government and the policies they create on behalf of and to help the citizens they represent. If the policies implemented create an environment where sellers can get their property sold with dignity, while keeping a gleam of hope for some future chance of home ownership again, then we are helping multiply the blessings in the future.

Otherwise, foreclosed home owners loose their chance of buying again while required to answer whether they’ve ever had a property foreclosed on or gave it back to the bank in lieu of.  Lenders in the future will be reluctant to lend to these folks.

To create policy that “overlooks” the foreclosure / character side of the mortgage application process in the future as a patch to address the needs of these borrowers 10 years from now, will be in that future, a hindrance to good lending practices. Instead, those borrowers should be allowed to sell with dignity today so they can perhaps buy again tomorrow.

Diverting resources and creating policy that “encourages” lenders to make a deal in a short sale rather than foreclose, will help stabilize prices, will help buyers get into good properties, and will help those outgoing homeowners get their act together so they can consider buying again in 3 to 5 years.

In the meantime, investors will consider buying short sales (once expediently processed), so they can enjoy rental income and then sell to future home owners when things improve, or continue to repair and resell to end-users and other investors as they have. Again, only if they can avoid the pain of the current short sale process.

I’m not coming up with anything that hasn’t been thought of. However, it is time for simple, sensible leadership, NOW.

— ### —

OPINIONS WELCOMED

Americor / Vacation Finance Lunches New Lending Product

In Buyers, credit, Distressed Sales, florida, forclosure, foreclosure, government, Home Buyer, Industry trends, Investing, Investor, IRS, lenders, Loan Program, Market Report, miami, miami beach, Miami-Dade County, Military, mortgage, National, Qualified Retirement Plan, real estate, Roth-IRA, second home, Self-Directed IRA, South Beach, Tax Matters, Trends, vacation home, Wenceslao on October 13, 2010 at 7:51 am

Using your IRA to buy Investment Real Estate

Posted: 12 Oct 2010 09:35 AM PDT

Americor Mortgage is launching a new loan program for investors who are buying investment property with their self directed IRA. Our mortgages will be NON-RECOURSE, and the individual does not need to qualify, the property does.

So even borrowers with recent credit challenges, low or retirement income, can get a mortgage through their IRA.

IRAs can buy condos, single family residential, and commercial income producing properties.

Contact Americor-Vacation Finance for more info: info@vacation-finance.com

To learn more about Self-Directed IRA rules visit http://www.IRS.gov

You may also contact Jason DeBono at Entrust Florida (www.EntrustFl.com) at JDeBono@EntrustFl.com who are qualified administrators for Self-Directed IRAs

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